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Harlington Upper School

Humanities

Geography Subject Leader: Mrs S Page

History Subject Leader: Mrs K Stocker

Psychology Subject Leader: Mrs C Godleman

Religious Studies: Mr P Jones

The Humanities faculty at Harlington Upper School offers a wide range of courses for students, as Humanities staff we attempt to generate an ethos of humanity in all of our work, both in and out of the classroom.

The breadth of courses provides opportunities for students to succeed at many levels and with a wide variety of different interests; there really is something for everyone within the faculty.

We recognise that learning takes place both in and out of normal lessons.

 

Curriculum Information

Subject

Geography

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

Edexcel B

Course Leader

Mrs Sarah Page

Course Summary

Students sitting GCSE in summer 2017:

GCSE Geography B course focuses on the ways geographical studies apply to their lives and to the real world, including physical and human geography and the relationships between people and environments.

 

Students sitting GCSE in summer 2018:

GCSE Geography B course offers an issues-based approach with specification content organised by UK and global geography. It also includes a decision-making paper, which allows students to investigate people-environment issues on a global scale.

What will students learn?

 

Year 9

Year 9 students – introduction to key human and physical geographical concepts and issues as a basis on which to build on for GCSE:

Changing Places

Dangerous World

Unfair World

What will students learn?

 

Year 10 - 11

(2016 – 2018)

Component 1: Global Geographical Issues

 Topic 1: Hazardous Earth

 Topic 2: Development dynamics

 Topic 3: Challenges of an urbanising world

 

Component 2: UK Geographical Issues

Topic 4: The UK’s evolving physical landscape – including sub-topics 4A: Coastal change and conflict and 4B: River processes and pressures.

Topic 5: The UK’s evolving human landscape – including a Case Study - Dynamic UK cities.

Topic 6: Geographical investigations – including one physical fieldwork investigation and one human fieldwork investigation linked to Topics 4 and 5.

 

Component 3: People and Environment Issues – Making Geographical Decisions

Topic 7: People and the biosphere

Topic 8: Forests under threat

Topic 9: Consuming energy resources

What will students learn?

 

Year 10 – 11

(2015 – 2017)

 

Unit 1: Dynamic Planet

This unit has three sections. Section A is compulsory, and Sections B and C contain optional topics.

Section A – Introduction to the Dynamic Planet

Compulsory topics: Restless Earth, Changing Climate, Battle for the Biosphere and Water World.

Section B – Small-scale Dynamic Planet

Coastal Change and Conflict

Section C – Large-scale Dynamic Planet

Oceans on the Edge

 

Unit 2:People & the Planet

This unit has three sections. Section A is compulsory and Sections B and C contain optional topics.

Section A – Introduction to People and the Planet

Compulsory topics: Population Dynamics, Consuming Resources, Globalisation and Development Dilemmas.

Section B – Small-scale People and the Planet

Changing Settlements in the UK.

Section C – Large-scale People and the Planet

The Challenges of an Urban World

 

Unit 3: Making Geographical Decisions

This unit will assess students’ ability to make decisions about geographical issues and justify them.

The unit includes the pressures (conflicts), players and options that are involved in making geographical decisions and which are related to sustainable development and environmental issues.

 

Unit 4: Investigating Geography

For this unit students need to complete a fieldwork investigation and report.

 

How will students be assessed?

Year 9

Students will be assessed by an end of unit test at the end of each unit.  These tests will assess knowledge, skills and understanding acquired throughout the unit.

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 10 – 11

(2016 – 2018)

Component 1: Global Geographical Issues

An externally-assessed written exam with three 30-mark sections. Of the 94 raw marks available, up to 4 marks are awarded for spelling, punctuation, grammar and use of specialist terminology1.

Section A: Hazardous Earth

Section B: Development dynamics

Section C: Challenges of an urbanising world

The exam includes multiple-choice questions, short open, open response and extended writing questions, calculations and 8-mark extended writing questions.

An externally-assessed written exam with three sections. Of the 94 marks available up to 4 marks are awarded for spelling, punctuation, grammar and use of specialist terminology.

 

Component 2: UK Geographical Issues

An externally-assessed written exam with three sections. Of the 94 marks available up to 4 marks are awarded for spelling, punctuation, grammar and use of specialist terminology.

Section A: The UK’s evolving physical landscape

Section B: The UK’s evolving human landscape

Section C: Geographical investigations

● C1: Students choose one from two optional questions (Coastal change and conflict or River processes and pressures)

● C2: Students choose one from two- optional questions (Dynamic urban areas or Changing rural areas).

The exam includes multiple-choice questions, short open, open response, calculations and 8-mark extended writing questions.

Component 3: People and Environment Issues – Making Geographical Decisions

An externally-assessed written exam with four sections. Of the 64 raw marks available, up to 4 marks are awarded for spelling, punctuation, grammar and their of specialist terminology.

Section A: People and the biosphere

Section B: Forests under threat

Section C: Consuming energy resources

Section D: Making a geographical decision

The exam includes multiple-choice questions, short open, open response and extended writing questions. Section C will include 8-mark extended writing questions and Section D will offer a choice of one from three decisions assessed through a 12-mark extended writing question.

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 10 – 11

(2015 – 2017)

Unit 1: Dynamic Planet

This unit is assessed through a 1-hour 15-minute, tiered, written examination, which contains a mixture of question styles. 78 marks are available, with 48 marks in Section A, 15 marks in Section B and 15 marks in Section C.

Of the 78 raw marks available, up to 6 marks are awarded for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar (SPaG).

Unit 2: People and the Planet

This unit is assessed through a 1-hour 15-minute, tiered, written examination, which contains a mixture of question styles. 78 marks are available, with 48 marks in Section A, 15 marks in Section B and 15 marks in Section C.

Of the 78 raw marks available, up to 6 marks are awarded for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar (SPaG).

Unit 3: Making Geographical Decisions

This unit is assessed through a 1-hour 30-minute, tiered, written examination. 53 total marks are available, spread across three questions.

Of the 53 raw marks available, up to 3 marks are awarded for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar (SPaG).

A resource booklet will be available in the examination. The examination will relate to the material in the booklet.

Unit 4: Investigating Geography

This unit is internally assessed under controlled conditions. Students complete one of the fieldwork tasks from the list provided by Edexcel. They must write up the fieldwork task under controlled conditions.

The task is marked out of a total of 50 marks across the following areas: planning, methods of data collection, data presentation and report production, analysis and conclusions, and evaluation.

The task will be marked by the teacher and moderated by Edexcel

 

 

Curriculum Information

Subject

History

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

Pearson Edexcel

Course Leader

Karen Stocker

Course Summary

During the GCSE course student s will study four units:

British Depth Study - B1 Anglo-Saxon & Norman England

Thematic and historic environment Option 11: Medicine & Treatment, c1250-present

Period Depth Study Option 26/27 Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941-91

Modern Depth Study option 31– Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-39

The course is designed to help students develop key historical skills and understanding across a broad chronological period.

Students will learn to explain the causes and significance of key events and people, so there is a focus on developing written skills.

There is an increased emphasis on the development of factual knowledge and

the quality of written English.

The course aims to prepare students for the study of history beyond GCSE.

What will students learn?

 

Year 9

 

 

 

Students will study a range of topics from the 19th and 20th century.

Topics will include:

The Industrial Revolution. The social and economic impact including law and order, the quality of living standards and life in the factories.

The British Empire with an evaluation of the positives and negatives and its legacy.

The causes of the First World War.

Life on the Western Front.

Road to War – the Inter War Years.

1940 – Dunkirk, the battle of Britain and the Blitz

The Holocaust

The dropping of the Atomic Bomb.

What will students learn?

 

Year 10

 

Students will study:

British Depth study: Anglo-Saxon & Norman England c 1060-1088

Anglo-Saxon England – how it was governed

The Norman Conquest – why William of Normandy won the Battle of Hastings

The Impact of the Norman Conquest – How the Normans kept control.

Thematic study and historic environment

Medicine and Britain c1250-present and the British sector of the Western Front 1914-18: injuries, treatment and trenches

What will students learn?

 

Year 11

 

Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-39

Germany in the 1920s: Economic and Political instability, Social developments – the ‘Golden Years’

The Nazi Party in the 1920s – its failure to make a breakthrough

The Wall Street Crash

The Impact of the Great Depression

The collapse of the Weimar Republic and the Rise of the Nazis

How the Nazis get in power and how they keep power

Nazi Social and Economic Policy

 

Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941-91

Origins of the Cold War 1941-58

Cold War crisis , 1958 -70

The End of the Cold War 1970-91

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 9

Baseline Test

Three Common assessments

The British Empire

Battle of the Somme – Success or Failure

Dunkirk - Success of Failure and focus on interpretations

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 10

Students will undertake a common assessment every half term. /these will focus on the higher tariff questions worth 12 and 16 marks.

Exam practice questions are embedded in the scheme of work and will also be set for homework. Some of these will be peer marked.

Students sit a mock exam at the end of year 10.

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 11

Students undertake a common assessment every half term. These l focus on the higher tariff questions worth 12 and 16 marks. They will be carried out in class and timed.

Exam practice questions are embedded in the scheme of work and will also be set for homework. Some of these will be peer marked.

Students sit a mock exam at the end of the Autumn term.

In the GCSE exam they will sit 3 Papers:

Paper 1 – The Thematic Study: Medicine in Britain c12501 hour 15 30%

Paper 2- Period Study and Depth Study – Anglo Saxon and Norman EnglandSuperpower Relations and the Cold War 1941-91 1hour 45 40%

Paper 3 – The USA Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-29 1 hour 20 30%

Resources (e.g. useful links)

 

 

 

Revise Edexcel GCSE (1-9) Revision Guide and Workbooks:

Anglo-Saxon & Norman England c1060-1088 9781292169705

Medicine in Britain c1250-present 9781292169750

Superpower relations and the Cold War 1941 – 91 978292169774

Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-39 97812992169736

Currently there is a promotion so these books are £2.49 using promo code 16REVCC

BBC Bitesize KS3

BBC Bitesize KS4

SchoolsHistory.org

 

Curriculum Information

Subject

Religious Studies

Qualification

GCSE Religious Studies A (8062)

Exam Board

AQA

Course Leader

Mr P Jones

Course Summary

The GCSE Religious Studies A specification offers a range and a variety of relevant and contemporary themes, ensuring a diverse choice of intriguing subjects to explore and discuss.

Students will learn how religion, philosophy and ethics form the basis of our culture, and develop valuable skills that will help prepare them for further study.

What will students learn?

 

Year 9

 

 

In Year 9 students will cover topics taken from the Bedfordshire Locally Agreed Syllabus.

The first topic that students will study is called ‘Barriers’. This topic explores themes of prejudice and discrimination looking at the Holocaust and the Rwandan Genocide to explore conflict.

The second topic students study is Buddhism. They will study the history of the religion in addition to developing an understanding of Buddhist teachings, beliefs and practices.

What will students learn?

 

Year 10

 

In Year 10 students will have the option of studying the AQA GCSE Specification A course. They will cover the beliefs and teachings of a religion in detail.

They will also cover two themes from the following:

The existence of God and revelation – This theme is about God and experiencing God. It will let students consider some of the arguments for and against God’s existence and will include key terms used to describe aspects of God.

Religion, crime and punishment – This theme is about law and order. It is about what we mean by crime, why people commit crimes, including the idea of evil people and actions, and the way society deals with offenders. It looks at the impact of crimes, the suffering they cause, and how we should help victims of crime. It is also about how we punish offenders and the debate about the death penalty.

Religion, peace and conflict – This theme considers the religious concepts relating to violence, terrorism and war. It covers beliefs and teachings about war and whether religion causes conflict. Finally, it will help students understand how individuals have fought for peace.

What will students learn?

 

Year 11

 

In Year 11 students will cover the beliefs and teachings of a religion in detail.

They will also cover another two themes from the following:

Religion and Life – This theme is about science and religion; how they compare and how they clash, especially about the origins of the universe and life. Students will also think about the value of the world, including environmental issues and animal rights. Finally, students will consider the value of human life, including issues of euthanasia and abortion.

Relationships and families – This theme is about personal and sexual relationships, including heterosexual and homosexual relationships. It goes on to cover how people show their commitment through marriage and other forms of cohabitation and what the family in the twenty –first century look like. Sometimes relationships end, so the theme also explores divorce as well as remarriage. Finally, it considers gender equality, particularly in the context of roles in the home, but also in society.

Religion, human rights and social justice – this theme covers human rights; what they are and why we should have them. It examines issues of prejudice and discrimination and covers the issue of poverty in the UK and across the world.

How will students be assessed?

Year 9

Through homework tasks, the use of quiz questions and questioning, end of topic assessments, sample questions and mock exams.

 

How will students be assessed?

Year 10

Through homework tasks, the use of quiz questions and questioning, end of topic assessments, sample questions and mock exams.

How will students be assessed?

Year 11

Through homework tasks, the use of quiz questions and questioning, end of topic assessments, sample questions and mock exams.

Resources (e.g. useful links)

 

 

BBC Bitesize Religious Studies: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zb48q6f

NATRE (about Religious Education):

http://www.natre.org.uk/about-re/about-re/